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Three doors, three stories

September 26, 2013

I got a bit carried away in this week’s prompt to the Friday Fictioneers and wrote three stories of flash fiction. I knocked, and inspiration answered. Some weeks are like that, I guess. Thanks go to Rochelle for being the hostess with the mostest for opening the door to the rowdy group of writers bringing their dishes to the pot luck dinner. For more stories on this prompt, click here.

Three doors in a field, by Rich Voza

 

Resounding Echoes

The front door slammed. Thuds echoed off the walls like an explosive gong. Gong. Gone. Lacy was gone. Only his thudding heartbeat in the room instead of a pair. A weight of finality this time. Maybe that was being melodramatic, maybe not. An echo of a friend-turned-therapist’s advice: When one door shuts, another opens. Bernard opened the same door, saw a hole where her car had been for years, and dreamed his yard flashed into a piazza, white sky against dark gray buildings, kids scurrying criss-cross, pigeons with bobbing heads, his unfinished manuscript clutched by his side. He started packing.

 

Knocks

Knock, knock.
— Who is it?
— It’s us.
— Anyone else?
— No, just us.
— Are you sure?
— Of course we’re sure. We weren’t followed.
— You can’t be completely sure. The organization’s very sneaky. They’re shadows among shadows.
— How poetic. C’mon, let us in already.
— I’m sorry, I can’t. You guys are too hazardous right now. I’ve got myself to worry about.
— You’re kidding, right?
— No.
— Fine. Have it your way. But you’re gonna be sorry.
— Too late for that. I’ve been sorry for years for getting involved in this mess.

 

Opportunity Knocked, Confusion Answered

“I’ve gotta ask: What’s with the doors, man?” Sage, the drummer, asked.

Pax, the bassist, shrugged and said, “Something about Blake and perception, stuff like that. Go ask the director. He lost me most of the time he was describing the whole thing.”

“William Blake? Huh? It’s more like Mondrian and Magritte go picnicking in the countryside. I just don’t get it. Our song’s about picking up chicks in Georgia. What the hell are doors doing in the video?”

“Ah, just go with the flow, man.”

“It’s hard to when I don’t understand the river we’re floating in.”

 


Friday Fictioneers prompt given by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. For other stories inspired by this photo, click here.
Photo copyright Rich Voza
Stories copyright Dave Williams

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31 Comments leave one →
  1. September 26, 2013 6:32 am

    Dear Dave,

    I’ll take Door number one. I really liked the first story. I guess she just got tired of playing second fiddle to his writing.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    • September 27, 2013 5:59 am

      Thanks Rochelle — that could be the reason she left him in the first story. I left it open, but that sounds like it would fit.

  2. September 26, 2013 6:37 am

    Dear Dave,

    Door number one did it for me. I’m in the piazza now. Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

  3. September 26, 2013 7:12 am

    Loved the second one. Nice work though, all three.

  4. September 26, 2013 9:14 am

    I should pack and find myself a piazza too. If I were in Italy right now, at this minute, then it’d be time for eating and siesta also. Man, I’m feeling hungry. And a nap feels about right.

    • September 27, 2013 5:57 am

      Ah, to be on that piazza right now… but a nap would be good, too.

  5. September 26, 2013 9:18 am

    Door number one was my favorite, though I really liked the third one too. Excellent work on all three!

  6. September 26, 2013 9:50 am

    Door number one for me as well, though they were all good.

  7. September 26, 2013 10:19 am

    Loved the snappy dialogue in the second. 🙂

  8. September 26, 2013 10:22 am

    All three are really good but I especially liked the last one.

    🙂

  9. September 26, 2013 10:35 am

    Oh these made me think of the Chic and Chong routine:

    • September 27, 2013 5:56 am

      Ha! I can see this with the second story, the back-and-forth with the closed door between the characters. You know, this was probably whispering from my subconscious as I was writing.

  10. September 26, 2013 10:36 am

    Well Cheech and Chong Routine. 🙂 Rule: Always finish coffee before typing.

  11. September 26, 2013 2:10 pm

    Number One is nothing less than fascinating. Multi-layered, intense, and poetical all at once. One can truly feel his pain and his promise

  12. September 26, 2013 4:37 pm

    Number one for me too, although I liked them all 🙂

  13. September 27, 2013 9:31 am

    “It’s hard to when I don’t understand the river we’re floating in.” – good line 🙂
    i found this prompt challenging, yet you wrote THREE stories for it, wow. quite impressive.

  14. September 27, 2013 10:58 am

    All three so different and all so good. Hard to pick a favorite but fascinated by #3.

  15. September 28, 2013 4:26 pm

    I like how inspiration knocked and I like how you answered! Hard to see a reason for three doors in a field other than to be inspirational. 🙂

    Thanks for your visits.

  16. September 28, 2013 10:17 pm

    Three very different stories. I liked the all, but probably liked the first one best. The character seems both pathetic and irrepressible at the same time.

  17. September 29, 2013 5:10 am

    I definitely like the last story the best. The idea of the bank intellectualising about their video, when their crappy song is about picking up chicks, man, is too cute.

  18. September 29, 2013 6:05 am

    It’s a tie between door number one and three. Very different but both were really good…

  19. September 29, 2013 1:03 pm

    Not sure I could choose, honestly. I liked each for very different reasons. One was compelling and poignant, and as writer… moving. I like the playful flow of two, and three is good dialogue and clever. One has more depth, and moves me, but they’re all good in their own right. I was tempted to write more than one, also… but left it at one. Nice work!

    • September 30, 2013 8:22 am

      Thanks so much for the feedback, as it’s always neat to see how my stories are received by others reading them. I’m glad you liked them for different reasons, too — each one had a different feeling when I wrote them. Thanks again!

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